This ain’t your faddy fitness blog

 

Why have a why page? Because I think you should know WHY I’ve created this site. Why I find it so crucial for us as a community to analyze training methods, fitness trends, movement dysfunction and societal habits. Why I think that keeping a pragmatic view is essential for results whether you’re trying to make yourself harder to kill or easier to look at.

Why ask why?

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All our lives we are spoon fed our education. Told what to know, how to view it and what questions to ask. It has left us complacent and assumptive in many of our endeavors and rarely do we push to pierce the crust of a problem in a pragmatic way. This has left many holes in the way we live. It’s deprived us of understanding the meaning of our actions, causing us to chase our tails instead of actually taking a firm grasp of our objective.

 

  • Would we beat obesity epidemic if we actually knew the root cause of why we eat what we do?
  • Would more companies succeed if they understood why customers buy their product rather than just how to make their product?
  • Would more people acquire the body they want if they actually understood the physiological mechanisms of fat-loss or muscle-gain and used this information to justify why they’re employing certain methods and diets?

 

You bet your ass they would.

 

The above philosophical concept may sound arbitrary coming from a guy who teaches pushups for a living, but I've learned firsthand the pitfalls of assumption and compliance in several areas of my life. I’ve learned that hard work alone rarely yields the results we want, whether it’s in the gym, the workplace or life in general. For years, my body was in constant pain, causing my career to seem stagnant, causing me to become reclusive to those around me. Being a trainer that can hardly train himself does demoralizing things to your sense of self-worth. I sought out many physical therapists and chiropractors to fix the pain, and was often left feeling worse. I wanted more than anything to cure the physical misery, to move on with my life and be able to further my career. But it seemed like every avenue I took for relief was built on false assumptions and caused me to continue to chase my tail. The amount of money, time and effort I bled from this just added to the chip on my shoulder.

 

With every failed attempt, more questions entered my head. I soon realized how so many false assumptions had warped my view of the world. I had assumed that the letters behind someone’s name meant they were competent. I had assumed that the education given to me in college was all that I needed to obtain a successful career. I assumed that the world rewards effort with results. In reality, none of this is  necessarily true. I decided to take responsibility for my pain, for my lack of understanding of what was going on. It was time to stop the assumptions and arm myself for the fight that had been given to me. I took responsibility for my education, poured through books and invested my time in continuing my perceptions of the body. I learned of variables that I had previously glossed over. I started taking responsibility for them, adjusting and progressing as necessary and slowly I started to feel better. The pain haunted me for 2.5 years. I lost weight, money and hours of my life that could have been spent with a smile on my face. But the knowledge and understanding that I found instead has been well worth the price. It’s something I want to share. It wasn’t enough to look at the symptoms that were being exalted and assume they were the problem, that’s where all other efforts had failed. It took investigation of the variables, rationalizing of how they fit together and exploration of what was actually at the root of the equation.  


Assume No More


It’s not enough for us to obtain what we want through hard work alone. We need to analyze, rationalize and own up to the variables within our control. In the words of Simon Sinek, “Many of us know what we do, some of us know how we do it, but very rarely do we find those that know why we do what we do.” In my mind, that understanding of why greatly coincides with our success. Knowing the why of your actions signifies a deeper understanding void of assumptions. It means that you’ll have a greater degree of application in your enterprise. It’s something that took me years to figure out on several levels and it’s what lead me to start this website.